Unsafe by Design: Tesla Fails to See Children, Red Lights, Emergency Vehicles…

Tesla Deaths: 304 (and 15 confirmed on “Autopilot”)

If there’s one thing, ONE THING, a car manufacturer should be able to do it’s meet baseline safety requirements of operating on public roads.

For example, a car should not be engineered to systemically increase risk of accidents that involve children, red lights and emergency vehicles.

Fail those three very important tests, while claiming to be fully automatic and “driverless”, and the car should be banned from operation.

Simple. Tesla is engaging in deceptive and unsafe business practices, while failing basic quality tests. It deserves a ban.

Can’t see children? Banned.

Can’t see red lights? Banned.

Can’t see emergency vehicles? Seriously? Banned.

There’s no question from all this that Tesla engineering has reached depths so low it should be classified as the worst car in automobile history.

…in nearly 400 crashes involving cars with driver-assist systems reported by automakers between July 2021 and this past May, more Teslas were involved than all other manufacturers combined.

It’s extremely alarming how much worse Tesla safety is versus ALL other brands combined.

Source: tesladeaths.com

And Tesla owners are so cult-like in their worship and embrace of such failure that when you inform them that their car may be dangerous for children they immediately try to put children in harms way.

Do you see the problem here, as I warned back in 2008?

The people calling themselves conservatives seem to have an amazing “hubris”. They not only stick to their guns in the face of science or even just details (like Lehman’s CEO who refused to believe his company was in trouble) but they actually become more convinced they are in the right when evidence starts to challenge them.

It falls into a line with someone today who would try to promote a 1970s Pinto, 1980s Yugo, 1990s Kia (e.g. 1993 Ford Aspire), or 2000s Pontiac Aztek… whereas today’s Tesla is at a significantly lesser engineering level than all of them.

More fires than a Pinto.

More quality issues than a Yugo or Kia.

More about appearance (nothing inside) than an Aztek.

Not only is Tesla full of unmistakable quality failures, given it’s built using misleading and even fraudulent manufacturing processes, society suffers from a “get rich quick” CEO who flaunts accountability with literal boasts and brags about safety capabilities that do not exist while putting everyone in and around the car in imminent danger.

I just got off a call with a prestige car repair shop (Mercedes, BMW, Jaguar, etc) who told me they consider Tesla the worst quality components they have ever touched. It’s so bad that their engineers are shocked by how many faults they find under the skin (see Aztek above) and said it’s a sad state of affairs anyone buys into one.

Perhaps it’s like asking in America why an obviously dangerous presence of lead in Michigan’s water took so long for action?

Fortunately it seems a certain state might just have the right stuff to start a “don’t mess with California” campaign.

The remedies proposed by the DMV if it prevails could be severe, including revocation of the company’s licenses to make or sell its cars in California.

Can California rid the public of garbage being dumped onto its roadways?

You may remember when the California DMV famously denied Uber an operating license because of false and deceptive claims about “driverless” technology.

It took less than a day for California to crack down on Uber’s self-driving cars
The future was here, briefly.

A terrible future that California banned, in order to have a better one.

Uber then took its backwards-thinking weak value systems to into Florida and Arizona instead where they could flourish with stupidly deregulated markets that don’t care about real quality let alone law and order.

“Our cars departed for Arizona this morning by truck,” an Uber spokeswoman wrote in an email. “We’ll be expanding our self-driving pilot there in the next few weeks, and we’re excited to have the support of Governor Ducey.”

Next thing you know Uber killed someone and shut down their entire driverless program, as that state governor danced around to evade his accountability for death.

In 2016, as Uber was refusing to comply with California’s automated driving law, I advised the state’s Department of Motor Vehicles to revoke the registration of Uber’s vehicles. After the DMV did so, Governor Ducey tweeted that “This is what OVER-regulation looks like! #ditchcalifornia.” The very tool that he harshly criticized California for using is the one on which the lawful execution of his own decision [to ban Uber] may now depend.

The important fact here is actually not about a wishy-washy politician getting a spine to ban Uber but that Tesla killed someone at almost the exact same time as Uber yet received none of the appropriate regulatory attention.

Tesla spent its energy since then trying to run propaganda campaigns and legal battles. Did you know about Tesla, or only about that Uber death?

Tesla Keeps Japanese Pedestrian-Death Case Out of U.S. Court

Tesla used armies of lawyers along with cult-like social media orchestrated propaganda campaigns to promote false narratives about sub-par engineering and escape scrutiny, then started charging for its obvious failures by generating a belief-based speculative “upgrade” based on deceptive and false promises of future capabilities (that will kill even more people).

See points above about Tesla drivers intentionally putting children in harms way after being warned of danger to children, a form of mystical worship of lower quality as some kind of “premium” opportunity to be a believer.

Will the state of California set a better future again and regulate away such anti-engineering death cultism, or is American private action the case here? Should also we be asking who will be the Erin Brockovitch who can stop a business intent on destroying the safety (integrity) of transit?

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